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BULLETIN BOARD SUBMISSION FORM Locked Topic 0 A. Miller To submit to this forum, please fill out the Bulletin Board Submission Form >--You must be signed in as a member to access this form--
by A. Miller
Monday, April 18, 2011
Fictions of Reproduction: Representations of Contraception and,,, Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Fictions of Reproduction: Representations of Contraception and Abortion in Film and Television First Name Megan Last Name Minarich Organization Vanderbilt University Email Address megan.l.minarich@vanderbilt.edu Summary This panel is organized around film and television that treats the issues of contraception and/or abortion in some way. The texts in question might address conception, pregnancy, and/or childbirth in the absence or contraception, or it/they may be more invested in presenting measures for or concern with the prevention of pregnancy. Films/programs may range from educational to entertaining, and may be generically diverse (melodrama, comedy, film noir, etc.). They may also vary in terms of national origin and time period. Here are some potential topics/questions: -To what extent is contraception/abortion politicized? In what way(s)? To what end(s)? -How do generic concerns affect how the topics are presented? -What is the relationship between contraception/abortion and censorship? First wave feminism? The birth control movement? Various social or religious groups, such as the Catholic Church? Women's agency? Eugenics? World War? Economics? -What similarities/differences do you notice between the early birth control films of the late 1910s and contemporary treatments of contraception/abortion in film/television? What accounts for these similarities/differences? -How does national sociohistorical context affect the treatment of these topics? How does this vary between different national traditions? -What formal innovations do you find to be associated with contraception/abortion? If you are interested in this panel, please send a cv an abstract of 250 words to Megan Minarich at megan.l.minarich@vanderbilt.edu by 20 August 2011.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Gendering Animation/Animated Gender Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Gendering Animation/Animated Gender First Name Michele Last Name Torre Organization Southern Illinois University Carbondale Email Address micheleltorre@hotmail.com Summary This panel seeks papers that will explore the ways in which gender interacts with and informs contemporary animated media. Papers will interrogate the problems and potentials that arise from the animated format in relation to gender construction and identification.Please email 250-word abstracts with 5-item bibliography and full CV to MicheleTorre (mtorre@siu.edu) by August 1. Panelists will be notified by August 15. Anyone one interested in chairing or serving as a respondent, should send an mail to mtorre@siu.edu.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Active Women: Historical Understandings of Female Heroes Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Active Women: Historical Understandings of Female Heroes First Name Elizabeth Last Name Clarke Organization Wilfrid Laurier University Email Address clar2780@mylaurier.ca Summary The gap between academic readings of female action heroes and popular notions of gender offers a new angle through which to examine the active female body in film. How do female characters serve to intersect genre and politics, academic and popular feminism and history with theory? Through an examination of the films in light of their historical context and reception, it is possible to contrast theoretical notions of femininity with popular understandings in order to develop a more nuanced history of the female action hero. We welcome proposals for papers focusing on Active Women throughout cinema's history. Please send your 300 word abstract, brief bibliography, and bio as email attachments by August 5th, 2011 to Liz Clarke and Dr. Cristina Lucia Stasia Submitters will be notified whether their proposals have been accepted for the panel by August 15th, 2011.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Violent Images Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Violent Images First Name Ora Last Name Gelley Organization North Carolina State University Email Address ogelley@gmail.com Summary Jean-Luc Nancy, in The Ground of the Image (2003), asks "what can link, in a particular way, the image to violence and violence to the image?” His discussion focuses on still and moving images of violence, and on images as violent. If it can be said that in the last thirty years or so the representation of trauma has figured as a key area of investigation in cinema and media studies, it seems in recent years that focus has shifted somewhat away from trauma and onto the question of the image's function or essence in relation to violence. I invite paper proposals dealing with theoretical investigations into violence and the cinema/the image or the history of violence onscreen. Potential topics include: the murder scene; violence and the "offscreen”: performative violence in film; crash aesthetics; theorizations of the "cut” and montage: gender and sexual violence; the horror film; and the aesthetics of violence. Please submit 300 - 500 word abstract and brief bio to Ora Gelley at ogelley@gmail.com by August 10.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
The “Host City”: A Place-Centered Consideration of the Media Festival Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: The "Host City”: A Place-Centered Consideration of the Media Festival First Name Robert Last Name Peaslee Organization Texas Tech University Email Address robert.peaslee@ttu.edu Summary This panel invites papers on relationships between film and media industry festivals and the urban, sub-urban or rural communities that claim them. As film and media festivals of all stripe proliferate around the world, a variety of stakeholders jockey for position and advantage in the geographical and cultural contexts chosen to host them. Many of these events are well-established and have assumed a defensive position aimed at maintaining brand identity and prestige. Others are ascendant, still others nascent at best. Each of these communities, however, have a unique relationship to their event(s), and each of these relationships provides fertile ground for investigating the role of media festivals in promoting discourses of community identity, establishing infrastructural networks, reifying the importance of being mediated, utilizing the "local” to speak "globally”, and a variety of other processes. Case studies on particular events/locations, comparative analyses, and attempts to theorize the event-location relationship are welcome, among other approaches. Questions addressed might include: – how do local communities create and grow a successful media festival? – how do established festivals deal politically, economically, structurally with host communities? – what benefits or challenges accrue for host communities? – what is the role of the festival in supporting both the community and the industry of which it is a part, and are these imperatives always in a state of cooperation? – what does it mean to be a "host city”? – what is the nature of the mediation occurring around festivals (as opposed to that deriving from other events)? -- how do we approach theoretically and epistemologically the festival/community relationship? -- how do historical/archival approaches to yesterday's festivals help us understand today's? Submissions are welcome on these and related questions, and international foci are encouraged. Please send abstracts of 250 words plus a short bio to robert.peaslee@ttu.edu by August 15, 2011.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Food for Thought: the cultural significance of food in Film and TV texts Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Food for Thought: the cultural significance of food in Film and TV texts. First Name Peri Last Name Bradley Organization Southampton Solent University Email Address periart21@aol.com Summary Food for Thought: the cultural significance of food in Film and TV texts. Food can be considered as one of the absolute essentials of life and its prominence on both cinema and TV screens in contemporary culture reveals its inherent significance to both the physical and social body. It has only recently become a valuable and coherent area of inquiry for cultural studies and the social sciences and this panel will further investigate its importance by considering representations of food on Film and TV. By exploring the relationship between food the body and culture it is intended to contextualise and analyse how it is used as narrative device, conveyor of meaning and articulation of desire in Film and TV texts. Areas of study can include; the gendering of food; food and class; the politics of food; food and obesity/anorexia; food and control; celebrity chefs; the ethics of food; food and desire; food and national identity; modes of consumption; food and health; food and community; the psychology of food; food and its correlation with the body; food and the abject. Please send abstracts of 250-350 words and author bio to Peri Bradley at p.bradley@bournemouth.ac.uk by August 5th 2011. Contributors will be advised by August 15th 2011.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Cinema and Multilingualism: New Perspectives Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Cinema and Multilingualism: New Perspectives First Name Tijana Last Name Mamula Organization John Cabot University Email Address tmamula@johncabot.edu Summary Cinema and Multilingualism: New Perspectives. This panel invites papers that open new avenues of research into the relation between cinema and multilingualism. The last decade has seen a burgeoning interest in this issue from various perspectives: the problematics of language loss have been addressed by scholars of transnational (exilic, diasporic, inter-cultural) cinema; a number of recent monographs have investigated the complex impact of multilingualism on international co-productions and the stakes involved in translating global cinema through various subtitling and dubbing practices. One of the obvious, but frequently overlooked, points affirmed throughout this research is that cinema has been a globalized - and transnational - medium from its very beginning, and that the question of language and linguistic difference has always been central to the production, distribution and reception of films. Bearing that in mind, this panel seeks to further open the field by examining how, and to what extent, the destabilization of monolingualism has shaped the evolution of film form and structured debates in film theory (e.g. do certain formal characteristics of the emigré film noir bear any relation to the filmmakers' passage from German to English? Is Kracauer's realism informed by an "exilic" faith in the communicative power of filmic images? and so on). Papers addressing any stylistic indices of multilingualism, both within the work of single individuals or across entire modes, genres or movements, are particularly welcome, as are papers dealing with canonical or "hegemonic" works usually excluded from the transnational/migrant cinema discourse. That said, submissions are welcome on any period of film/media history and any aspect of film theory. Please send abstracts of 250 words and a short bio by August 8 to tmamula@johncabot.edu.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Cinematernity - Representations of Motherhood Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Cinematernity - Representations of Motherhood First Name Shira Last Name Segal Organization Indiana University Email Address sbsegal@indiana.edu Summary In the spirit of E. Ann Kaplan’s Motherhood and Representation (1992) and Lucy Fischer’s Cinematernity (1996), this panel will explore representations of motherhood, corporeality and the domestic sphere in cinema, television and the Internet. In particular, our aim is to examine the intersections between art, (auto)biography, and the personal and political affect of representation. Possible questions include but are not limited to: How is motherhood romanticized, fetishized, pathologized, or normalized in our visual culture? How do feminists and filmmakers grapple with the topic of motherhood, and with what possibilities of subversion and/or consequences on mainstream visual ideology? What is the aesthetic-political significance of this work in terms of larger cinematic practices, narrative tropes, genre considerations, or hegemony? The panel seeks to make connections across a variety of sub-topics, and may range from documentary and experimental cinema to fictional representations of maternity and parenthood or autobiography online. Please send an abstract of 250-350 words and a brief author bio to Shira Segal at sbsegal@indiana.edu no later than Friday August 5th. Participants will be notified of their selection by August 15th.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Il Bandito/a: Class, Crime and International Film Noir Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Il Bandito/a: Class, Crime and International Film Noir First Name Dennis Last Name Broe Organization Long Island University Email Address dennis.broe@liu.edu Summary Critics have often hinted at and of late become more vocal in their discovery of the relationship between class tensions and that permutation of the crime film called film noir. This panel will explore how those tensions have either gone global or were always that way in eruptions of what has too long been thought of as only Hollywood’s shadowy style in all corners of the globe both in the present and in the classical period of film noir. British and French film noir have for a long time been explored by critics but here too much is left unsaid including the pre-history of noir inscribed in French poetic realism and the defeat of the Popular Front (La Bete Humaine), and the social thrillers (It Always Rains on Sunday) of British studios like Ealing known primarily for social comedies. Asian noir has consisted not only of Kurosawa’s classic period explorations of class tensions (Stray Dog, High and Low) in the period of Japanese militant union activism but also of the Korean corrupt police film which indicts the entire judicial system (The Unjust) and the use of the crime film to explore intra-Asian immigration and migrant issues (Yellow Sea), to say nothing of the existential turn that has recently inflected the Turkish gangster film (Cakal). Potential topics for discussion include: the relationship between noir and the social problem film; noir as a locally resistant adaptation of a Hollywood genre which keeps that form’s classic period critique of the power structure intact or noir as Hollywood form that commercializes socially inflected cinema; noir, corruption and class conflict in global post-recessionary cinema (ala France’s Rapt); noir as site of female contestation or as masculinized form sustaining unequal class and gender politics; and regional noir and its relationship to regional class formations (i.e. Scandinavian and Mediterranean noir). Deadline for submissions: Sunday, August 15. Send 250 word abstract with 5 item bibliography and full academic CV (as separate e-mail attachments) to: Dennis Broe (dennis.broe@liu.edu). Submitters will be notified as to the status of their proposal by August 22, 2011. Dr. Dennis Broe Media Arts Department 1 University Plaza Brooklyn, NY 11201 Tel.: 718-488-1345
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Bodies that Matter: Representations of Motherhood in U.S. Media Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Bodies that Matter: Representations of Motherhood in U.S. Media First Name Amanda Last Name Rossie Organization Ohio State University Email Address amanda.rossie@gmail.com Summary CFP: Bodies that Matter: Representations of Motherhood in U.S. Media In times of national crisis, focus often shifts to the figure of the mother, which has come to represent everything from savior to monster. Representations of maternal bodies make their way into popular films, television shows, news coverage, and other media, drawing our attention to the multiple meanings these bodies hold in the stories we tell about ourselves as Americans. As such, this panel will discuss compelling and telling representations of motherhood / the maternal in U.S. media, with a focus on how these maternal bodies relate to culture, politics, religion, and the construction of the nation. To be considered for the panel, please submit 300-word abstracts to the panel chair, Amanda Rossie (Ohio State University) by August 15, 2011 at amanda.rossie@gmail.com.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Confronting Change: Media Industries at (Various) Crossroads Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Confronting Change: Media Industries at (Various) Crossroads First Name Deron Last Name Overpeck Organization Auburn University Email Address dmo0001@auburn.edu Summary The American entertainment industry -- encompassing film, television, video games, social media, et al. -- has long been marked by rapid change that threaten to upset accepted industrial practice or intraindustrial relationships. This panel looks to investigate how the industry's various branches have responded to such changes or upheavals in industrial structure throughout its history. Of particular interest would be papers that examine: **how one branch adapts (or doesn't) to technological developments in another branch; **how film industries in other countries have responded to the introduction of television or other media; **how technological or other changes are negotiated within the industry (i.e., are trade-offs made, what other changes are required, etc.); **whether or not strategies for adapting to or incorporating change are successful. These are suggested topics; any proposal that falls within the broad parameters of this panel are welcomed. Please send proposals to the e-mail address listed with this call, or to the below mailing address: Deron Overpeck Department of Communication and Journalism 232 Tichenor Hall Auburn University Auburn, AL 36849 Auburn, AL.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
The Renaissance of Ideas in Media Studies Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: The Renaissance of Ideas in Media Studies First Name Gabriel Last Name Paletz Organization Prague Film School Email Address gabriel.paletz@filmstudies.cz, gmpale@hotmail.com Summary Auteurism and humanism; forms of realism and formalism, and studies of national psychology are just some of the ideas of foundational importance to media studies in academia. The influence of these intellectual approaches waxed and waned, with several apparently discredited in the course of changes within the discipline, such as with the rise of post-structuralist theory in the late 1960s. However, the capacious range of methodologies on which contemporary scholars can draw includes both post-structuralist theory and the return of many ideas which were earlier rejected. This panel seeks papers which, while based in a scholar’s current work, take a historical view of the field. Beginning with an explanation of the intellectual approach, or mix of approaches, guiding your research, papers should explore three related questions: What are the roots of particular guiding ideas—including but not limited to those cited above—at the origins of media studies? What circumstances in scholarship and teaching brought about their separation from the mainstream of the discipline? Finally, and most importantly, what new productions and scholarly conditions have made it possible, and even desirable, for these ideas to return; what accounts for the revival of these intellectual approaches in their current usefulness for you and other media scholars? A 250-word abstract, including references and author bio of one paragraph, should be sent by August 3 to Gabriel M. Paletz at the Prague Film School in Prague, Czech Republic at both of the following addresses: gabriel.paletz@filmstudies.cz gmpale@hotmail.com
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Boredom Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Boredom First Name Casey Last Name Riffel Organization University of Southern California Email Address riffel@usc.edu Summary The pronouncement, written by Dan Kois in the New York Times Magazine on May 1, 2011, hit a nerve in the film blogosphere: the consumption of so-called "boring" films such as Tarkovsky's SOLARIS was akin to "eating one's cultural vegetables." The perceived cultural assumption against which Kois's piece reacts pits boredom against entertainment, enlightenment against pleasure, and the rapid against the attenuated. The kerfuffle among the commentariat may only prove to be another skirmish in the historical and ongoing war between two supposedly antagonistic views of film (i.e., Michael Bay cannot be art except to the philistines; Tarkovsky can only be enjoyed by true cinephiles). However, the recent salience of the question of cinematic "boredom" provides this panel with an opportunity to historicize and analyze the relationship between the cinema, the spectator, and film meaning in terms relevant to our current moment. A media consumers becomes increasingly atomized and media is consumed in smaller and smaller pieces, does the concept of "boredom" provide a topical lens through which to think about issues of temporality, spectatorship, and aesthetics? This panel is open to papers which attempt to either historicize or theorize the debate around boredom. Topics may include but are not limited to: --Modes of spectatorship across geography and history --The architecture and technologies of consumption: theaters, households, phones --The historical aesthetics of editing (long takes, deep focus, fast editing) --Theories of temporality in cinema, especially the intersection of temporality and phenomenology --Cinema in the museum and the development of cinematic "taste" or connoisseurship --Rethinking films or filmmakers that have been considered either eminently "boring" or "entertaining." --The history of the cultural value of contemplation --The history and theory of the spectacle and the culture of distraction Please send a 300-word abstract and 50-word biography by Monday, August 8 by email to riffel@usc.edu.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Specialty Film Distribution Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Specialty Film Distribution First Name Lisa Last Name Dombrowski Organization Wesleyan University Email Address ldombrowski@wesleyan.edu Summary This panel will explore the distribution of specialty films, including those variously described as art, independent, or festival cinema. Papers may consider large-scale trends or individual case studies, and may address any national/regional market. The focus will be on contemporary (21st century) specialty film distribution, but papers comparing past and present and/or considering the future are also welcome. Applicable topics might include (but are not limited to): specialty distributors, including those affiliated or unaffiliated with major studios; distributors as producers; emerging forms of distribution, including video-on-demand, the Internet, and self-distribution; the expanding role of film festivals in specialty film distribution; the role of sales agents; the relationship between distributors and exhibitors; distribution and marketing. If you are interested in participating in the panel, please submit a title, approximately 250-word abstract, and brief bio by August 8, 2011 to ldombrowski@wesleyan.edu. I will reply to all submissions by August 15.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Something Missing: Transnational Discourses and Practices of War, ... Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Something Missing: Transnational Discourses and Practices of War, Embodiment, and Vision First Name Maryam Monalisa Last Name Gharavi Organization Harvard University Email Address gharavi@fas.harvard.edu Summary This panel seeks to consider the "someone missing something”—in which the face, a limb, or a particular sense (sight, for instance) functions analogically to impede another’s cognition or premonition of interiority or humanity. Henri-Jacques Stiker observes that at the scene of modern war, personhood is violently made partial in body and also mind: "Mutilation applied to all alteration of integrity, of integralness. It amounted to a degradation, but one by removal—or deterioration—which has the effect of suppression. The maimed person is someone missing something precise, an organ or function.” We extend this concept to the age of hypervisibility and screen culture. This "missing” or unseen part that blocks recognition—because it is covered, obscured, or otherwise absented—becomes a microsite for surveillance, incarceration, rehabilitation, even imagined or actual death. We especially seek papers that explore the consequences of sovereign powers and governmentality "restoring” a sense, function, body, or organ that aligns the target once again with a regime or liberal government. Paper topics are not restricted to but may include economies of the body, technologies of surveillance, advertising and photography, biopolitics/thanatopolitics, borders, simulacra (masks, prosthetics, artifices), panoptic sites of policing and soldiering, battlegrounds of war (including the global "War on Terror”), and cinematic depictions thereof. Please send a 300-word abstract to Maryam Monalisa Gharavi (gharavi@fas.harvard.edu) and Mimi Thi Nguyen (mimin@Illinois.edu) by 8 August, 2011. You may include a 3-5 item bibliography if you wish. We will notify participants by 15 August, 2011.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Animation, in Theory: Film Studies' Special Relationship with Animation Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Animation, in Theory: Film Studies' Special Relationship with Animation First Name Suzanne Last Name Buchan Organization University for the Creative Arts Email Address sbuchan@ucreative.ac.uk Summary The panel will focus on historical theoretical texts that have significantly informed and underpinned the recent expansion of Animation Studies. For example, seminal essays, specific fragments, even single paragraphs and sentences have formed the basis for a foundation for some methodological and theoretical approaches in Animation Studies. Film Studies authors authors could include Stanley Cavell, Tom Gunning, Jean Mitry, Noël Carroll, Vivian Sobchack or Gilles Deleuze. Panelists are free to frame a contribution around their own sources, and to include other disciplines, such as philosophy, fine art and critical theory. The panel will also explore and articulate animation theory’s increasing relevance in cinema and media studies for both celluloid based and digital formats. Please send your 300 word abstract with references, keywords and affiliation by August 2nd to:   Suzanne Buchan at sbuchan@ucreative.ac.uk.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
A Case for Criticism: Journalism, TV Studies, and the Television Critic Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: A Case for Criticism: Journalism, TV Studies, and the Television Critic First Name Karen Last Name Petruska Organization Georgia State University Email Address kpetruska1@gsu.edu Summary Whereas the television critic is an oft’ cited figure within television histories and reception studies, the complicated role the critic plays within the print, television, and new media worlds is increasingly becoming a primary site of analysis for television studies. This panel invites proposals that place the focus upon better understanding how the critic not only shapes and responds to the dominant trends within television but also draws attention to programming and issues often on the margins of the mainstream. How does the critic negotiate his/her complicated position at the intersection of the journalism, television, and new media industries? How can we evaluate the critic’s impact, not only upon the relative longevity of programming but also upon how programming is evaluated? How is criticism changing in the twenty-first century, and what can we learn about the impact of digital technologies upon the television industry by analyzing the critic’s own adoption of digital platforms? Suggested focal areas include an examination of the critic and aesthetics, history, technology, journalism, industry (for example, promotions/marketing, ratings or the economics of television), reception, paratexts, or global media. Please submit a 250-word abstract and a brief bio to Karen Petruska at kpetruska1@gsu.edu and Myles McNutt at mamcnutt@wisc.edu by August 8. Panelists will be notified by August 15.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Animating Space and Scalar Travels Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Animating Space and Scalar Travels First Name Sylvie Last Name Bissonnette Organization University of California, Davis Email Address sylvie_bis@hotmail.com Summary In our era of media globalization and bioengineering, recent modes of visualization have given us the possibility to experience the world at a variety of scales. In moving images, explorations of the body interior, journeys through cosmic landscapes and scientific representations of the molecular realms challenge the viewers’ spatio-temporal frames of reference and produce novel embodied experiences that influence meaning making. This panel welcomes papers on animation, new media and video games that consider the exploration of animated space and papers that analyze films on scalar travels. One of the principal objectives of this panel will be to investigate whether the treatment of scale in media may reflect the state of current scientific discourses, express anxieties about technologized forms of life or even echo reactions to change in society. This panel will explore whether mediated experiences of space can confront accepted views on the limits of the body and life. Papers that examine the possibility that embodied forms of rhetoric may rework the cultural and political boundaries of the human, the definition of life, and national boundaries are especially welcomed. Possible paper topics may include (but are not limited to): -Documentary films on scalar travel and the production of ideological discourses on humankind -Biotourism -The representation of cosmic landscapes and their emotional effects on the spectators -Scaling the world with Google map -Visualizations of the gene -Journeys through the molecular realms -Scalar explorations from the perspective of avatars -Embodied explorations of cyberspace and synthetic worlds -The phenomenology of scale Please submit a title, a 250-300 word abstract, a list of 5 bibliographical references, and a short bio to Sylvie Bissonnette (sbissonnette@ucdavis.edu). Submit your documentation by August 1. Applicants will be notified no later than August 15.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
Cinema/Media/Systems Locked Topic 0 N. Dye Type of Posting Panel Panel/Workshop Title: Cinema/Media/Systems First Name James Last Name Morrison Organization Claremont McKenna College Email Address jmorrison@cmc.edu Summary The concept of systems figures largely in many of the ways that key aspects of cinema and media as institutions or theoretical constructs have been framed. This panel welcomes proposals that consider the significance of that concept in discussing the studio system, the star system, the textual systm, the continuity editing system, media networks as systems, etc. Why has this trope of the system recurred so insistentently across film and media theory? What does its recurrence imply about the place of cinema/media within modernity/postmodernity more generally? Especially welcome are considerations of the application of systems theory - as elaborated by Niklas Luhmann and others - to questions of cinema and media theory. Please send 300 word abstract with five bibliographical references and brief author bio to jmorrison@cmc.edu by August 12.
by N. Dye
Friday, July 15, 2011
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